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Hall of fame Ivy League football visionary: Georgia No. 1, ‘change of Alpha Dawg’

Hall of fame Ivy League football visionary: Georgia No. 1, ‘change of Alpha Dawg’

ATHENS — Georgia football fans will take comfort in knowing where the No. 1 vote the Bulldogs received came from in the FWAA-NFF Super 16 Poll. Two-time Super Bowl combatant Reggie Williams is more than just the only African-American Ivy League player in the College Football Hall of Fame. Williams, a former NFL linebacker and World Football League general manager, is a visionary. Why Georgia football? So why did Williams vote the Bulldogs No. 1 on his preseason ballot? RELATED: Georgia football No. 3 in Super 16, receives No. 1 vote “I’ve been believing the Alabama hype every year since I’ve been voting, and it’s time in the SEC for a change of Alpha Dawgs,” Williams, a member of the FWAA-Super 16 voting panel since its inception five years ago,   told DawgNation on Monday. “This is going to be a year where Georgia has the teeth to maybe get it done,” Williams said. “You just don’t know how the quarterback situation will unravel at Alabama. I don’t see lightning striking twice there.” Williams is a former NFL Man of the Year Award recipient who played in two Super Bowls during his NFL career with the Cincinnati Bengals (1976-1989). Off-field works As impressive as his football career was and is, Williams off-field work is even more fascinating. Williams was the director of community relations for the NFL for Super Bowl 27 in Pasadena, Calif., working as an ambassador amid tensions the year of the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. It was while working and fundraising in Los Angeles in the early 1990s that Williams met Michael Eisner, CEO of Disney from 1984-2005 and owner of the then-expansion Anaheim Mighty Ducks. The relationship blossomed, and Williams was named vice president of Disney’s Wide World of Sports Complex, spearheading the concept, building and operations of the one-of-a-kind facility. “I told Michael Eisner, ‘I lost two Super Bowls, that should not be what is remembered in your greatest sports events,’ “ Williams said. “Competing at Walt Disney World is unique, because even if you lose, you are at the happiest place on earth. Spitting that out made Michael Eisner beam, and he said, ‘We’re gonna do this.’ “ Indeed, and on Monday Williams dared to share a vision that Georgia football fans can only hope comes to fruition. Reggie Williams’ complete FWAA-Super 16 ballot 1. Georgia 2. Alabama 3. Clemson 4. Ohio State 5. Wisconsin 6. Auburn 7. Washington 8. Penn State 9. Michigan State 10. Miami (FL) 11. Michigan 12. Oklahoma 13. Stanford 14. USC 15. Notre Dame 16. Florida State The post Hall of fame Ivy League football visionary: Georgia No. 1, ‘change of Alpha Dawg’ appeared first on DawgNation.

No. 1 Halep withdraws from final tune-up for US Open

No. 1 Halep withdraws from final tune-up for US Open

Top-ranked Simona Halep has withdrawn from the Connecticut Open, citing a sore right Achilles tendon. The Romanian was scheduled to play Tuesday in New Haven, but says in a statement her Achilles is sore from 'two weeks of many matches and I need to recover in time for the U.S. Open.' Halep won the Rogers Cup in Montreal on Aug. 12 and advanced to the finals in Cincinnati, losing in three sets Sunday to Kiki Bertens at the Western & Southern Open. The New Haven tournament also lost American CoCo Vandeweghe to injury. She withdrew Sunday with a sore right ankle while leading in the third set of her first-round match with Magdalena Rybarikova of Slovakia. Fourth seeded Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic lost Monday to Ekatereina Makarova of Russia 6-1, 6-3.

Ohio State trustees set Wednesday meeting on Meyer's future

Ohio State trustees set Wednesday meeting on Meyer's future

Ohio State trustees set a private meeting for Wednesday to talk about the future of coach Urban Meyer as the university seeks to quickly move past a scandal that has consumed the football program for nearly a month. Meyer has been the subject of an investigation into the handling of domestic-abuse allegations against former assistant coach Zach Smith. The university said factfinders briefed the board on Monday. The panel will convene in a public session on Wednesday morning before going behind closed doors to discuss the next steps. President Michael V. Drake will have the final say on whether Meyer keeps his job or faces other consequences. '(Monday's) briefing is to ensure that board members are adequately prepared to discuss this matter at Wednesday's meeting,' Ohio State spokeswoman Emily Caldwell said Monday in an email. No timetable was given for final resolution of the matter, which has overshadowed the team's preparation for the 2018 season that begins at home Sept. 1. The trustees hired an outside law firm for $500,000 to do the investigation, which took two weeks. The investigation centers on what Meyer knew and did about allegations of abuse against Smith, who was fired July 23 after his wife sought a protective order. Smith hasn't been charged or convicted of abuse, but his ex-wife Courtney Smith alleged her husband shoved her against a wall and put his hands around her neck in 2015. Meyer has said he handled the accusations properly when he found out about them, but acknowledged he lied to reporters at first when he said he hadn't heard of the incident. Ohio State put Meyer under investigation after Courtney Smith went public, giving a reporter text messages and pictures she traded with Meyer's wife, Shelley Meyer, in 2015. Drake, the Ohio State president, is rarely in the public spotlight, unlike his predecessor, Gordon Gee, who prided himself on his reputation as a fast-talking, ubiquitous, and sports-loving Ohio State fanatic. Drake surprised Ohio State fans in 2014 when he fired the school's marching band director after an investigation uncovered band traditions and rituals that were racy, raunchy or suggestive. The band director, Jonathan Waters, said he had been trying to change many of the activities before he was terminated, but Drake stood his ground despite intense criticism over the firing. He and the university insisted that Waters controlled the band at the time of the probe and was answerable for all of its practices, even those that evolved out of old traditions. ___ Associated Press writer Andrew Welsh-Huggins contributed to this report. ___ More AP college football: http://apnews.com/tag/Collegefootball and http://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Mitch Stacy at http://twitter.com/mitchstacy

'Why am I still hiding this?': The state of mental health in the NBA Stars such as Kevin Love and DeMar DeRozan opening up has been an important step, but the stigma of mental health remains alive in NBA locker rooms.